Thursday, October 8, 2015

Interesting Splits For The Playoff Teams

To see the splits for MLB over the years 2010-14, go to Major League Situational Stats, 2010-2014. Here they are to provide reference for the numbers I give below:

Compiled using the Baseball Reference Play Index.


Split PA BA OBP SLG OPS
Total 923779 0.254 0.319 0.398 0.717
None On 520158 0.249 0.310 0.393 0.702
Men On 403621 0.261 0.332 0.405 0.737
RISP 238074 0.255 0.339 0.394 0.733
Late & Close 153559 0.240 0.316 0.365 0.681

Here is what I have for the years 1991-2000. The relative differences are not too much different than they used to be.

At the end of this post I provide link for the batting and pitching splits pages of each team.

Rangers have an OPS differential of -.008 (.739-.747). But somehow they won 88 games. It could be their bullpen that made the difference. They allowed an OPS of just .667 in Late & Close situations. That is .080 below their overall OPS allowed, a much bigger than normal differential.

The Blue Jays had OPS of .878 with men on. With None on it was .735. 4 times normal gap. With RISP, it was .839. Again, abnormally high when compared to the None On OPS. Their batters had just a .716 OPS in Late & Close situations. Overall, it was .797. So they were abnormally low in Late & Close situations. Maybe that partly explains their 15-28 record in 1-run games.

Their pitchers allowed an OPS of .769 with RISP while with None On it was .688. That is much bigger than normal.

The Royals had an OPS differential of just .024 (.734 - .710). Using my estimate of

Winning Pct = .5 +1.3*OPSDIFF

That gives them a .531 pct., lower than their actual pct. of .586. So how did they do so well? They had a .778 OPS with runners on and .701 with none one.  With RISP it was .772. Their pitchers allowed an OPS of just .668 with RISP while it was .700 with none on. That is impressive given that teams usually hit better with RISP.

The Royals pitchers allowed an OPS in Late & Close situations of just .629, far below their overall OPS allowed of .710. That beats the normal differential by quite a bit.

The Astros had an OPS differential of .071 (.752 - .681).  Astros estimate to .592  but they actually had only .531. Their pitchers allowed a .660 OPS with None On but it was .713 with Men On and .707 with RISP. They allowed .684 Late & Close situations. So that is a weakness, given that normally it is lower than overall OPS allowed.

The Cardinals had an OPS differential of .040 (.716 - .676). Their hitters had a .713 OPS with None On but it only goes up to .719 with Men On and actually falls to .683 with RISP. In Late  Close situations it is .713, so it drops off alot less than normal.

But the Cardinal pitchers have been great with Men On and with RISP. The allow a .711 OPS with None On but in the other two it is .618 & .630, respectively. Those are very large differentials considering that they usually go up.

The Cubs had an OPS differential of .057 (.719 - .662). So larger than the Cardinals'. Nothing unusual about their hitters but their pitchers allowed a .626 OPS with None On but it shoots way up with Men On and with RISP where it is .712 and .718. So the reverse of the Cardinals.They allowed only .608 in Late  Close situations, a bigger drop off than normal.

The Dodgers had an OPS differential of .070 (.739 - .669).  Nothing unusual about their hitters but their pitchers allowed a .633 OPS with None On but it shoots way up with Men On and with RISP where it is .724 and .721. They also allow .694 in Late & Close situations, well above their normal level, the reverse of the MLB average.

The Mets had an OPS differential of .040 (.712 - .672). The Mets don't appear to to have any interesting splits.

Dodger batting splits
Dodger pitching splits

Mets batting splits
Mets pitching splits
 
Cardinals batting splits
Cardinals pitching splits
 
Cubs hitting splits
Cubs pitching splits
 
Royals batting splits
Royals pitching splits
 
Astros batting splits
Astros pitching splits
 
Blue Jays batting splits
Blue Jays pitching splits
 
Rangers batting splits
Rangers pitching splits

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